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July 20, 2010

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Tom Terlizzi  10-19-2011

Interesting reason the car radio got invented see excerpts below FROM A NEAT WEB SITE:
http://www.antiqueradiomuseum.org/thecarradio.htm

SUNDOWN

One evening in 1929 two young men named William Lear and Elmer Wavering drove their girlfriends to a lookout point high above the Mississippi River town of Quincy, Illinois, to watch the sunset. It was a romantic night to be sure, but one of the women observed that it would be even nicer if they could listen to music in the car.

Lear and Wavering liked the idea. Both men had tinkered with radios – Lear had served as a radio operator in the U. S. Navy during World War I – and it wasn’t long before they were taking apart a home radio and trying to get it to work in a car. But it wasn’t as easy as it sounds: automobiles have ignition switches, generators, spark plugs, and other electrical equipment that generate noisy static interference, making it nearly impossible to listen to the radio when the engine was running.

SIGNING ON

One by one, Lear and Wavering identified and eliminated each source of electrical interference. When they finally got their radio to work, they took it to a radio convention in Chicago. There they met Paul Galvin, owner of Galvin Manufacturing Corporation. He made a product called a “battery eliminator” a device that allowed battery-powered radios to run on household AC current. But as more homes were wired for electricity, more radio manufacturers made AC-powered radios. Galvin needed a new product to manufacture. When he met Lear and Wavering at the radio convention, he found it. He believed that mass-produced, affordable car radios had the potential to become a huge business.

Lear and Wavering set up shop in Galvin’s factory, and when they perfected their first radio, they installed it in his Studebaker. Then Galvin went to a local banker to apply for a loan. Thinking it might sweeten the deal, he had his men install a radio in the banker’s Packard. Good idea, but it didn’t work – half an hour after the installation, the banker’s Packard caught on fire. (They didn’t get the loan.)

Galvin didn’t give up. He drove his Studebaker nearly 800 miles to Atlantic City to show off the radio at the 1930 Radio Manufacturers Association convention. Too broke to afford a booth, he parked the car outside the convention hall and cranked up the radio so that passing conventioneers could hear it. That idea worked – he got enough orders to put the radio into production.

Carl Schwab

Tom I only got to reading your post today (2 November 2011). Between my post and your addition I think we have the "WHOLE
STORY" pretty much. In 1934, I was about 5 years old; I remember a hired hand that worked on our farm had a 1928 Chevy
that had a Gavin Black Box with the mechanical coaxial control cables that brought the tuning and volume controls to the steering column. As I grew up and attended High School I worked in a radio repair shop and got my hands into many car radios and
all the interference source "chasing".
Thanks for the additional info-------------Carl Schwab

Charlie - Motorcycle MOT Fleet

Thank goodness someone took the initiative to invent them; although, I will say that they can increase the traction of road rage, but that depends on the music you have playing.

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